How to Pass the NREMT the First Time

Passing the National Registry for Emergency Medical Technicians (NREMT) exam the first time isn’t easy unless you prepare yourself thoroughly with study materials and practice tests. It’s important to practice with as many simulation questions as possible to understand how the questions are framed and what you’re expected to know.

Becoming a certified emergency medical technician (EMT) means you need to take the NREMT exam at the end of your training. The exam is the national standard test for EMTs, advanced EMTs, and paramedics in the United States.

This exam is quite complex, with questions from five key study areas. Unfortunately, many EMT students fail their first attempt–especially those who don’t prepare thoroughly. So, you must prepare yourself by reviewing NREMT practice test questions.

Where to Find NREMT Exam Practice Questions

Your main concern should be where to find great NREMT practice tests. Luckily, there are numerous online resources that you can rely on for practical NREMT practice questions. For instance, you can get more than 2,000 practice questions, quizzes, and nearly 500 tutorial videos from the Paramedic Coach.

These resources are carefully prepared by someone with a deep understanding of the NREMT exam and EMS overall. With expert help, you can increase your chances of passing the exam on the first try.

Tips for Passing Your NREMT the First Time

Aside from utilizing the tools offered in Paramedic Coach’s Video Vault, here are a few tips to help you on exam day:

Read the Questions Carefully

Although the main purpose of reading a question is to answer it correctly, you must understand it first before you answer. The best way to read your NREMT exam questions is to start with the last part of the question and read the four answers provided.

Then, go back and read the entire question, ensuring you identify the keywords. It’ll help you determine what the examiner wants to know from you and the most applicable answer.

Keep It Simple

One common mistake NREMT students make when taking their exams is to assume that the NREMT is trying to trick them. So, they complicate the questions when they don’t need to.

Others choose the most straightforward answers because they believe in the ‘BLS before ALS’ concept. BLS stands for Basic Life Support, while ASL stands for Advanced Life Support. Following this concept when answering NREMT questions can be confusing.

Because the NREMT exam is adaptive, it contains questions and answers to determine your competency level in each area of study. Therefore, the examiners provide four multiple answers closely related to each other to test your comprehension of the topic and the question. There’s only one correct answer and three distractors.

So, don’t assume that complex answers are the correct ones. Choose your answers based on your understanding of the questions and the examiner’s intention.

Develop the Right BLS and ALS Algorithms

You’ll find questions that ask you to choose critical medical emergency response steps in their order of priority. These questions are meant to determine your understanding of medical emergency issues.

They can give you a headache if you don’t have the right BLS and ALS algorithms. A good algorithm will help you organize the steps in the right order. 

Have the Right Mindset

Most EMT students who fail the NREMT exam do so because they have the wrong mindset‒they believe the exam is complicated even before they read the questions. This mindset will only lead to failure because you’ll be intimidated by simple questions.

This doesn’t mean you should simplify the test and assume it will be easy. Expect difficult questions, but believe that you can knock them out.

Closing Thoughts

Reviewing NREMT practice questions and following the advice provided by the Paramedic Coach will give you enough confidence to take the exam successfully the first time. Check out the Paramedic Coach today to learn more about our online NREMT test prep program!

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